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Dot NET is live online

Macworld UK

Mac|Life ReviewMacLife Rating - Great

About.com rates Canvastic
Read the full review here.

Press Release 4/6/06

Press Release 11/1/05

What are Canvastic teachers saying?

4 Stars from MultiMedia and Internet @ Schools

Technology and Learning Magazine notes Canvastic's Release

eSchool News notes Canvastic's Release

Press Release 1/26/05

News and Views

Canvastic for Mac and Windows is now totally green.

Download only, no more CDs!

 

Canvastic for iPad now has a free version!

Canvastic Free and Canvastic for $.99. Check them out.

 

Canvastic Dot NET is now Free!

There is no cost to use the online version for primary students. Just visit Canvastic.NET. Download the press release here.

Advertisement free subscriptions are still available, contact us.

 

New Preferences for Netbook Computers

The new small netbook computers have less space on their monitors. They are usually 1024x600 which is wide but not tall. These preferences have been tweaked for the smaller monitor resolutions.

Click here for the Windows netbook preferences.
Click here to download the entire Canvastic archive with the netbook preferences already installed.

 

Canvastic Supports the Stimulus Package Funding for Ed. Tech. - THIS PROGRAM HAS ENDED.

Canvastic LLC announces support for the administration's stimulus package by offering a 50% discount for purchases made, in any part, with stimulus package funding. Click here for the press release.

 

Canvastic Continues to Grant Huge Licenses to Tech. Savvy School Districts - THIS PROGRAM HAS ENDED.

Canvastic LLC announces the continued search for school districts that are technology leaders nationwide. Districts will be awarded licenses of Canvastic version 3.5 valued from $10K to $200K or more. The company will make the award to any district that meets the qualification criteria. The company will award one unlimited building site license ($949 value) for every two elementary and middle schools in the district. This is a pure gift with no obligation beyond installation of the program. Canvastic LLC feels that these gifts will help the program become more widely known as a great choice in student publishing in K-8. Click here for the press release.

 

Canvastic DOT NET Launches - Click here for press release.

See this page for full details.

 

Canvastic will be at

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math at the Denver Convention Center, October 24-25. Free and open to the  public. Click here for more info.

 

Macworld UK Rates Canvastic with 4 Stars!

"Although Canvastic’s the kind of program you might buy for your children to use at home to get used to computers and creative packages, its real strength is in schools. We’d advise teachers and educators with budget control to take a look at the free trial version. " Read the whole review here.

 

Version 3.5 Ships - Click here for press release.

See this page for full details.

 

Canvastic Grants Huge Licenses to Tech. Savvy School Districts THIS PROGRAM HAS ENDED.

Canvastic LLC announces the search for school districts that are technology leaders nationwide. Districts will be awarded licenses of Canvastic version 3 valued from $10K to $200K or more. The company will make the award to any district that meets the qualification criteria. The company will award one unlimited building site license ($949 value) for every two elementary and middle schools in the district. This is a pure gift with no obligation beyond installation of the program. Canvastic LLC feels that these gifts will help the program become more widely known as a great choice in student publishing in K-8. Click here for the press release.

Park City, Utah Elementary Schools Adopt Canvastic After Participating in the 2 Month Pilot Program

 

Steamboat Springs, Colorado Adopts Canvastic using Thin Client System

Click here for the press release.

 

Mac|Life Magazine Rates Canvastic GREAT

They chose Canvastic as one of the "Best Mac Software for Kids" with a GREAT rating in the July 2007 issue. See the magazine's web site here. Click here for the review PDF.

 

Version 3 Ships - Click here for press release.

 

Version 3 available for schools to pilot for 2 months - Click here for press release.

 

Nicholas Negroponte from the One Laptop Per Child project recently said:

"In fact, one of the saddest but most common conditions in elementary school computer labs (when they exist in the developing world), is the children are being trained to use Word, Excel and PowerPoint," Negroponte wrote in an e-mail interview. "I consider that criminal, because children should be making things, communicating, exploring, sharing, not running office automation tools."

We couldn't agree more. However, it is not just the "developing" world! See the whole article here.

 

Canvastic Ships Version 2.1

This maintenance release is a free upgrade of course. It includes several minor bug fixes and enhancements to features and is a recommended upgrade for all users. Click here to download. Click here to read the facts.

 

Canvastic Version 2 Compatible with New Intel Macs

Canvastic Version 2 is compatible with the new Intel Macs. Version 2.5 will be published as a Universal Binary. See apple.com for more details on this new hardware development from Apple Computer.

 

A Great Quote from Technology and Learning's Special Report: Envisioning the Future

We will speak in pictures; the new Esperanto is the multimedia collage. Basic design will become as important as expository writing. If the SAT is still alive, it will have a drawing, or at least graphing, component.

-Jason Ohler

We think this glimpse of the future speaks to what we are trying to enable for our students with Canvastic. When students have a graphical component in their published pieces there is a serendipitous energy that occurs. The student's writing prompts more detail in the images created and the details of the image spur more content to be added to the text. Both sides of the brain are engaged and motivated.

See the full report at: http://www.techlearning.com/25years/

 

Canvastic Ships Version 2

Packed with over 40 new user-requested features, refinements, and fixes, Canvastic v2 is even more flexible, powerful, and easy to use. Teachers have expanded options to customize the application to meet students' needs. Click here for the pdf. Click here to read on-line.

 

Visual Learning Report from MultiMedia & Internet @ Schools

Sept/Oct 2005 - www.mmischools.com

At McElwain Elementary School in Denver, teachers are using Canvastic's graphics/text publishing tool for K-8 students to address the needs of their second language learners. They use pictures in their teaching to help students with comprehension and to enhance learning. The library media center has 16 eMacs that can be used by students cooperatively or independently, so for many projects, a class is divided and half of the students work on the computer while the other half works with the teacher-librarian doing research with books or an interactive writing or editing lesson.

This year, third graders studying the water cycle as part of their unit on weather created colorful diagrams to show the cycle of evaporation, condensation, and precipitation—required learning as one of the Colorado state science standards. The diagrams created using Canvastic were displayed on bulletin boards in the hallways of the school, enabling many students in other grades to read the labels and learn about the water cycle.

For more on Canvastic's publishing tool head straight for the Community/Idea Exchange at www.canvastic.com/community/ideaexchange/ to see lesson plans from teachers and examples from both students and teachers that press Canvastic's software into the service of visual learning.

 

MultiMedia and Internet @ Schools Reviews Canvastic Overall Rating 4 Stars - Click here for the pdf

March issue, 2005. www.mmischools.com

 

Canvastic Chosen for eMINTS K-2 workstations - click here

Canvastic is one of the choices for eMINTS K-2 workstations. Using technology to create learning experiences that engage young learners in new ways is at the heart of the eMINTS (enhancing Missouri's Instructional Networked Teaching Strategies) program. This program is changing the face of education across Missouri and into other states. eMINTS is an extraordinary example of a K-20 partnership that has produced remarkable results.

Also: eMINTS Becomes the First Resource to Meet All Criteria in ISTE’s NETS Review Program - click here

 

Technology and Learning Magazine notes Canvastic's Release at FETC - Click here for the pdf

Canvastic is noted as "What's New" in the March issue.

 

eSchool News notes Canvastic's Release at FETC - Click here for the pdf

Canvastic LLC, a brand-new company based in Colorado, introduced its self-titled software program, a project-focused desktop publishing tool for K-8 students that works with Windows or Macintosh computers, including Mac OS X. Company founder Steve Gandy, a 25-year veteran teacher of K-6 students, said he created the program in response to what he saw was a real need in the marketplace....click here for the complete article.

 

Canvastic utililizes "Universal Design" with its scalable interface...

This is a quote pulled from a recent eSchool News article....

"Universal design" is another emerging technology concept garnering attention from the nation's top ed-tech enthusiasts. With the reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) slated to take place during the next session of Congress, Raymond Rose, vice president of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit educational research and development organization based in Concord, Mass., says the pressure is on for schools to begin looking at solutions that meet all students' needs--and not just those with severe disabilities.
Under the concept of universal design, Rose said, technologies are beginning to emerge that can be used for dual purposes--to the benefit of everyone within the school system. The concept, he said, is similar to that of building a wheelchair ramp. Though the ramp is built specifically for students confined to a chair, it can be equally useful for students with temporary ailments--or even those with too much in their hands, who might have difficulty navigating traditional steps.
"Schools need to think about tools that will meet all students' needs," Rose said.

 

Canvastic Grows With the User

Canvastic adheres to the concept of 'Universal Design'. Since, every student is different and interacts with technology and software in different ways, Canvastic was designed to be very flexible from its conception. Unlike most computer programs that present a screen that is full of buttons, options and functions, Canvastic only shows what the instructor wants it to show. It can be as basic and limited as needed. For example, a student that has never created a document on a computer can be given a canvas, a paint brush, and colors as the total environment. You can even hide the color choices! When that student has mastered those capabilities more tools and functions can be added one by one. The instructor can teach the proper use of each tool and the student can start using that tool in conjunction with just the ones she already knows. At the upper level, the student is presented with a complete set of graphics, text and presentation tools that reaches the publishing needs of most regular education middle school students. But the really unique feature is the fact that every possible variation in between the two extremes of the program's capabilities is possible. The available, tools, the arrangement on screen, the capabilities and options presented are all parts of Canvastic's scalable interface that is marketed with the term 'Grows With the User'.

 

Learning.com White paper addresses the need for software that is flexible...

This excerpt from Learning.com's white paper on educational technology supports how Canvastic was designed with flexibility in mind... Click here to see the entire white paper.
Technology applications (e.g. software for word processing, presentation, data analysis, etc.) can offer benefits to learners that other, less technology-infused instructional approaches cannot. Three significant advantages involve feedback, environment, and automated personalization. Software-based instruction can deliver immediate, personalized feedback for every student. A rich multimedia environment can engage multiple learning styles and skill levels simultaneously. Furthermore, software allows an educator to tailor instructional materials and assessments to address directly the needs and speeds of individual learners. These characteristics of technology are tied to improved academic achievement, increased motivation, more positive attitudes, and higher selfesteem in K-8 students, according to gold-level studies.
Wong (2001), for example, concluded that timely, rich, and immediate feedback is vital to improving learning and motivation levels. Mathew (1997) found that CD-ROM interactive storybooks enhanced students’ motivation and reading comprehension. Mitchell and Fox (2001) reported similar results with K-1 literacy software.
Gold-level studies suggest that for greatest effectiveness, software design should be open and flexible. This allows teachers to more easily fit use of the software into their curriculum (Brush, Armstrong, Barbrow, & Ulintz, 1999). Similarly, an open design provides students with multiple ways to engage with the content, which leads to increased academic achievement (Matthew, 1997; Mitchell & Fox, 2001). The research also indicates that curriculum design is as important as software design when integrating technology in classrooms (MacArthur, Graham, Schwartz, & Schafer, 1995; Thomas & Hoffmeister, 2002). Notably, gold-level SBR indicates that the use of technology in K-8 classrooms can lead to improved motivation, attitudes, and academic achievement in students, but does not necessarily do so. Learning outcomes seem to be a question of balance: too little technology has scant impact, but too much may overwhelm the educator or confuse students. Variables to consider in finding an effective balance include the age and skill base of students, the subject area, and the experience of the teacher in integrating technology (Laffey, Espinosa, Moore, & Lodree, 2003; Waxman & Huang, 1996). Gold-level studies show that technology integration can lead to improvements in students’ reading, writing, and mathematics skills. Collateral benefits beyond the core function of learning a subject, such as improved computer skills, confidence, and academic motivation, have also been identified (Matthew, 1997; Ross, Hogaboam-Gray, & Honnay, 2001).

 

Quote shared by a discussion list member...

This was shared by someone signing up for the Canvastic mailing list and seemed to go with our philosphy quite well!

"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius, and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction."- Einstein

 

A high school teacher writes...

I use Canvastic with my Special Needs students. Programs such as Photoshop are really great but too confusing for beginners. I like being able to turn off features and introduce a few elements at a time. My Special Needs students are always so proud of their work and feel like they can do some of the same things their classmates are doing. They actually learn some useful skills that can later be applied to other programs.